The Best 1RM Calculator: Calculate Your One Rep Max

Use our 1RM calculator to estimate how much weight you can lift in a one-rep max.

Simply enter the number of reps you can do with a given weight (in any unit), and we will calculate not only your one-rep max, but also your 1–10RM.

Estimated 1RM

Estimated Rep Maxes

100% of 1RM
94% of 1RM
91% of 1RM
88% of 1RM
86% of 1RM
83% of 1RM
81% of 1RM
79% of 1RM
77% of 1RM
75% of 1RM
100% of 1RM
94% of 1RM
91% of 1RM
88% of 1RM
86% of 1RM
83% of 1RM
81% of 1RM
79% of 1RM
77% of 1RM
75% of 1RM

The results are calculated using Epley’s equation. It is one of the most accurate formulas for calculating 1RM in the squat, bench press, and deadlift.1

Epley’s equation looks like this:

1RM = Weight (1 + Reps/30)

Note that this calculator is also available for free in our app StrengthLog.

What is 1RM?

1RM stands for one repetition maximum. It is the maximum amount of weight you can lift for a single repetition. In the same way, your 2RM is the maximum amount of weight you can lift for two repetitions, 3RM is the maximum weight you can lift for three repetitions, and so on.

Strength Standards from the Users of StrengthLog

How does your strength in the squat, bench press, and deadlift stack up against others?

Below are calculated median 1RMs for these lifts, using data from 45 158 users of our app StrengthLog.

Men’s Strength Standards, Median 1RM (kg)

<80 kg Body Weight80–100 kg Body Weight100+ kg Body Weight
Squat110130157,5
Bench Press90105120
Deadlift140165190

Women’s Strength Standards, Median 1RM (kg)

<60 kg Body Weight60–80 kg Body Weight80+ kg Body Weight
Squat7582,595
Bench Press455060
Deadlift90100113

How Many Reps Can You Do at a Given Percentage of Your 1RM?

Using Epley’s equation, we can estimate how many repetitions a person can typically do at a given percentage of 1RM. These are only estimates, of course, and the individual variation is big.

Number of reps at percentage of 1RM

Here are the estimated percentages of 1RM you can use for a number of repetitions between 1 and 20:

RepetitionsPercentage of 1RM
1100%
294%
391%
488%
586%
683%
781%
879%
977%
1075%
1173%
1271%
1370%
1468%
1567%
1665%
1764%
1863%
1961%
2060%

How to Warm up for a 1RM Attempt

Time to go for a new 1RM?

Enter your target one-rep max in the field below, and we’ll calculate your warm-up weights.

Warm Up For 1RM

Warm-up Sets:

x 8 reps
Rest for 1 min

x 8 reps
Rest for 1 min

x 5 reps
Rest for 2 min

x 5 reps
Rest for 2 min

x 4 reps
Rest for 2 min

x 4 reps
Rest for 2 min

x 3 reps
Rest for 2 min

x 3 reps
Rest for 2 min

x 2 reps
Rest for 3 min

x 2 reps
Rest for 3 min

x 1 rep
Rest for 3 min

x 1 rep
Rest for 3 min

x 1 rep
Rest for 5 min

x 1 rep
Rest for 5 min

x 1 rep

Note: this calculator is also available (for free) in our workout app StrengthLog. When you track your training in our app, we also calculate the estimated 1RM of every set that you do.

You can read more about warming up for a one-rep maximum in this guide: How to Warm up for a 1RM Attempt.

What’s the Difference between 1RM and PR?

  • PR stands for Personal Record and it is the heaviest weight you have ever lifted.
  • 1RM stands for one-rep max and is the heaviest weight you can currently lift for one rep.

Your 1RM can both be higher or lower than your PR. And in contrast to your PR, your 1RM has nothing to do with whether or not you have actually ever lifted it.

Confused? Read more here: 1RM vs PR: What’s the Difference?

Want a good way to keep track of your PRs in any given exercise?

Check this out:

Workout log app personal records
StrengthLog keeps track of all your personal records in every exercise – for free.

How To Increase Your 1RM

To increase your 1RM means to increase your maximum strength. There are many different ways to go about this, but the three main ones are to improve:

  • Your muscle mass. A bigger muscle can produce more force. To build muscle efficiently, check out our muscle group training guides on this page.
  • Your technique. With better technique, you can make better use of the muscle you’ve got. Check out our exercise technique guides, especially the ones for the squat, bench press, and deadlift.
  • You neuromuscular efficiency. The last piece of the puzzle is how efficient your muscles are in terms of activation, contraction, and coordination. Our strength training programs are great for improving this, while simultaneously building muscle.

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References

  1. The Accuracy of Prediction Equations for Estimating 1-RM Performance in the Bench Press, Squat, and Deadlift, Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: November 1997 – Volume 11 – Issue 4 – p 211-213.